spoopycopequinn:

I babysit for a girl who used to think her mom’s name was “my love” because her dad said it so often to her.

(via bronwyngrace)

edwardspoonhands:

birdbonewinchester:

Did William Shatner just ask Hank Green to be on his GISHWES team?

He did, and I really don’t know how to feel about it. Like…he’s William Shatner…does he really need /my/ help?

Q

greenteablossoms asked:

On a scale from 1-10, how Zuko are you? C:

A

rufiozuko:

10,000 degrees of pure fire! ;)

detailsdetales:

The Ambassadors, detail (1553)
Hans Holbein the Younger
detailsdetales:

The Ambassadors, detail (1553)
Hans Holbein the Younger
detailsdetales:

The Ambassadors, detail (1553)
Hans Holbein the Younger
detailsdetales:

The Ambassadors, detail (1553)
Hans Holbein the Younger

detailsdetales:

The Ambassadors, detail (1553)

Hans Holbein the Younger

(via cabinet-de-curiosites)

onewasmysterious:

Period drama costumes
→ Anne Boleyn, The Tudors s02e02
onewasmysterious:

Period drama costumes
→ Anne Boleyn, The Tudors s02e02
onewasmysterious:

Period drama costumes
→ Anne Boleyn, The Tudors s02e02
onewasmysterious:

Period drama costumes
→ Anne Boleyn, The Tudors s02e02
“Don’t worry about being original, she said dismissively. Yes, everything’s been written, but also, the thing you want to write, before you wrote it, was impossible to write. Otherwise it would already exist. You writing it makes it possible.”

Alexander Chen reminisces about studying with the inimitable Annie Dillard, who echoes Mark Twain’s contention that all ideas are second-hand, consciously and unconsciously drawn from a million outside sources, Alexander Graham Bell’s assertion that "our most original compositions are composed exclusively of expressions derived from others,” and young Virginia Woolf’s observation that "all the Arts … imitate as far as they can the one great truth that all can see.”

Chen’s full essay is well worth the read. Pair with Annie Dillard on writing.

(via explore-blog)

Yup!

(via yeahwriters)

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

archaeologicalnews:

A team of researchers with members from France, Great Britain and the U.S. has found that lead concentrations in drinking water in Rome, during the height of the Roman Empire were 100 times that of local spring waters. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of…